Common Solutions to an Over-Nitrogen'ed Bucket and How to HandleIt

Common Solutions to an Over-Nitrogen'ed Bucket and How to HandleIt
Senior Gardening: Growing Tomatoes

When it comes to over-nitrogen'ed buckets, the best course of action is often not to do anything. Letting the plants outgrow the excess nitrogen can be a viable solution. However, if the tomato plants are already showing signs of too much nitrogen, such as twisted and thick new growth, then more drastic measures may need to be taken. Digging out the espoma tomato tone fertilizer ring, and flushing the container mix a couple times could help. Alternatively, digging out the tomato plant, replacing the container mix with fresh mix, and putting the tomato back in without any fertilizer can also be an effective solution.

It's important to consider other possible causes for the twisted and thick new growth before assuming that it is due to excessive nitrogen levels. Herbicides present in composted cow manure can cause similar symptoms, so replanting some of the worst looking plants in alternate pots without manure could help determine whether this is indeed the case or not. If after a week or two there is no difference in new growth, then it is likely due to too much nitrogen.

In addition to taking corrective measures when dealing with over-nitrogen'ed buckets, one should also watch out for blossom end rot which tends to occur when plants grow too fast. Taking pH readings can also be helpful in determining what kind of soil amendments might be needed. Finally, somebody once said that fresh sawdust/wood chips sucks up nitrogen, so adding these materials might help reduce excessive nitrogen levels as well.In conclusion, over-nitrogen'ed buckets can be a tricky problem to solve. However, with the right approach and some patience it is possible to get things back on track. Digging out the fertilizer ring and flushing the container mix or replacing it altogether are two effective solutions that could help reduce excessive nitrogen levels in tomato plants. Additionally, taking pH readings and adding fresh sawdust/wood chips might also prove beneficial in this situation.

Hi, I think my tomato plants have too much nitrogen. What should I do?

You can try a few different things. First, you can let the plants go and hope they outgrow the over-nitrogen. Second, you can toss the tomatoes and try replacing with something from a nursery. Third, you can dig out the Espoma Tomato Tone fertilizer ring and flush the container mix a couple times. Fourth, you can dig out the tomato, replace the container mix, and put the tomato back in. Fifth, you can dig out the tomato, bare root it, replace the container mix with fresh mix, and put the tomato back in leaving out the tomato tone. Lastly, you can take a PH reading to see if that is causing any issues.

Is it possible that herbicide damage is causing this issue?

Even though composted cow manure can be a source for herbicide damage if the cows grazed on land sprayed with 2-4D to keep down weed growth in pasture, it is more likely that too much nitrogen is causing this issue.

Should I replant a couple of the worst looking plants in alternate pots without the steer manure?

Yes, this could help determine if herbicide damage is causing this issue or not. After a week or two, you should notice a difference in the new growth.

What are some signs of too much nitrogen?

Signs of too much nitrogen include twisted growth curling under itself, very thick vegetative growth, no flowers, and eventually mealy tomatoes.

Can I fix this problem by adding anything else to the soil?

It is best to avoid adding anything else to the soil as this could make the problem worse. Extra nitrogen won't last long in a bucket with a mature tomato plant so just watering it should be enough.

Is there anything else I can do to help my tomato plants?

Yes, you can add a layer of mulch around the base of the plant. This will help keep the soil moist and cool, as well as reduce weeds. Additionally, you can prune off any dead or diseased branches to help promote healthy growth. Lastly, you can fertilize with a balanced fertilizer such as Espoma Tomato Tone to give your plants the nutrients they need.